Jack Szostak

Biochemistry

Shared the 2009 Nobel Prize in medicine for the discovery of telomeres.

"There was something completely different about the DNA ends."

Birthdate
November, 1952

Birthplace
London, England

Residence
Boston, Massachusetts

Family Members
  • FATHER: Bill Szostak (deceased), aeronautical engineer
  • MOTHER: Vi Szostak (lives in London, Ontario)
  • SISTERS: Kathy and Caroline Szostak
  • WIFE: Terri Lynn McCormick, plus two sons

Other Interests
Szostak is an amateur geologist. "Turns out there are rock outcrops just south of Boston that consist of irregular and diverse rock fragments embedded in a smooth matrix. These are rocks dropped by melting glaciers into sediments, and they date from the time of one of the 'Snowball Earth' episodes about 630 million years ago. Pretty cool!"

Title
Professor

Office
Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital

Status
Working

Degrees
  • BSc McGill University, Montreal, Canada (Cell Biology) 1972
  • PhD Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (Biochemistry)1977

Awards
  • Walter W. Ross III Memorial Scholarship
  • Penhallow Prize in Botany, McGill University
  • National Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • National Academy of Sciences Award in Molecular Biology
  • Louis Vuitton-Moet Hennesey 'Vinci of Excellence' Award
  • Susan Swerling Memorial Lecture, Dana Farber Cancer Institute
  • Nobel prize in Physiology and Medicine (shared)
  • Hans Sigrist Prize, University of Bern, Switzerland
  • elected member of National Academy of Sciences
  • Fellow of New York Academy of Sciences
  • Genetics Society of America Medal
  • Harrison Howe Award, American Chemical Society, Rochester section
  • Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award
  • Dr. H.P. Heineken Prize for Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Mentor

Ray Wu, a Cornell University geneticist who developed the first method for sequencing DNA


Last Updated
October 7, 2011

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